Presence

Good day! It has been a while. In this post I’ll be talking a bit about presence, one of our game design courses.

Presence was one of our free-choice electives for this year. The course puts focus on creating a simple game in collaboration with the PXL music departement. However, due to lack of participating PXL students, the music part in our group was done by one of our own Game student as well.

The theme this year was to focus on an animal, any animal, and create a fantasy environment as said animal would experience it (“Presence”). Overal, the theme and what exactly we would make was very open, which really excited us to get started.

To give you a brief view: We had many different ideas on which animals we could focus on, but eventually settled on going with the beautiful Koi fish. Figuring out the gameplay however… let’s just say that our group had many ups-and-downs trying to settle for one clear idea. Visual looks, 2D or 3D (or a mix perhaps?), movement… for several weeks it seemed as if our project was bound to fail. It wasn’t until we were near the end of the course that we suddenly felt like there’s was something we all agreed on, but once we did, our motivation and workflow suddenly rose up by several hundred percent and we created something we were all proud of.

With permission, we had created a 2D game but with a more top-down view of the koi fish, rather than a world seen through its own eyes. My part of our group was the creation of all the artwork. While my initial concept sketches (see below) showed a more realistic view of the koi world, they eventually evolved into fantasy-esque ponds inspired by pixel art and traditional Japanese/chinese art. My main lesson in this course was to try not to hold on to one idea too much, but instead learn to set it aside and create something entirely different. This was something I more or less already knew, but I think many artist notice that in some ways they still like to hold on to something once they really like it. Therefore, it can be really hard to completely step away from it.

First concept sketches

Evolved towards this more fantasy look. Created purely by experimenting with random settings in Unity.

fishy

The final gameplay consists of guiding a koi fish in pond of umbrellas, while mimicing the path of a second koi fish.

You can see all of the final art & gameplay in this youtube gameplay video < < Nishikigoi Gameplay > >

GameArt: Material Study

Kepa_Kaya_Materialstudy

Time to put some life on this blog again. For those interested, I’m mostly active on my DeviantArt, hence the lack of posts here. http://white-starcloud.deviantart.com/   You can also find links to some other social media websites I use in the “About me” tab! 🙂

One of the tasks for Game Art we received this year is the famous “Materials study”. A basic yet, in my opinion, very fun digital drawing practise. Some of these (the jello one actually) were a bit of a challenge but nonetheless I feel quite proud of the results. I usually very rarely use references when drawing, so I admit I went a bit free-style on some of these instead of closely observing the real thing.  For the jello one I had to look up a small tutorial, because it just wouldn’t work out the way I wanted it to. The ‘Old window’ one looks a bit more like a metal ball instead of glass, but I blame that on the reference picture I used (which did indeed have that quite dark, blurry look). The skin & moss ones are probably my favourites out of the set. As much as I enjoy digital art, I mostly do traditional artworks so it might be interesting to someday try doing these in watercolours if I find some time. 🙂

 

Case 1.4

Case 1.4 / End Case

Final task of the year was to create a game. (as our study direction suggests we do).
The idea/concept of our game was something we’ve been working on the entire year.
The last three weeks of the year were the time we had to make the game.

I’m not going to go too much into detail about this one, as I’d probably be writing an entire
book if I did, but this task really showed a lot about how much an idea can change throughout
the year. Mainly because of limitations of ability or time, but also because you tend to
grow tired of ideas that otherwise seemed to be incredible to you. I think this is probably
one of the most important lessons learned from this year.
I didn’t manage to put everything I wanted into the game, but despite that, I’m quite proud
and happy with what I’ve achieved.

To give you a basic idea about the game I made, here’s the pitch:
To save the life of a dear friend, a boy (the player) gets pulled into a sort of watercolour world.
It this world he must collect pieces of her heart (Heart Pieces) by finding his way through a route
with the help of watercolour techniques. He must learn to use these in a simple but smart way.

It’s a simple game that mainly focuses on the calm atmosphere and story and wants to let the player
relax a bit. But of course he must sometimes think a bit about what would be the best way to reach
his goal.

1 Liamallicia

Naamloos Naamlooss

Naamloos

Game Engines Final

Game Engines

Task: Create a (short) game based on old arcade (or alike) type games.

Programming is, in a way, fun, but it’s also the subject I have most trouble with.
For this little game I chose to make something based of Space Invaders.
To explain the game;
There’s two lines & each has 5 holes that shoot bullets. One of the lanes is the enemy, which
randomly shoots one or more bullets out of its 5 holes. The other line is controlled by the player.
The player too can shoot bullets out of their 5 holes (by clicking on the a,z,e,r,t keys).
Now, what you basically have to do is shoot and destroy the bullets the enemy shoots at you. However
if the enemy hits your line and/or you hit the enemy line, it’s game over! With other words, you may
only hit the bullets. Try to keep up for as long as possible.

I was quite proud of this game. Unfortunately, for some reason, I couldn’t get the scoring system to
work. It helped me a lot programming wise though. I finally started to properly understand several
things. The game itself is actually also quite fun to play in my opinion.. (has both normal & hard mode)

Naamloos Naamloos2

Photo Manipulation

Graphic Visualisation

Our last task for Graphic Visualisation this school year was to create a photo
manipulation. We had to include ourselves in the picture we made.

Although I’ve never done a real photo manipulation before, I’ve worked with Photoshop
for quite some time now, so luckily I know how most tools etc work. Usually I just work
with adjustments, but we had to show what we did during the progress & leave all
layers seperate so I had to use the other adjustment function (which can be
selected next to where you create a new layer). True, since the changes you made are
now on a seperate layer, you might be able to undo them later. But personally, I still
prefer using my way. Probably because serveral things didn’t want to work the way I
wanted them to with this second option.
Since I have a big fascination for the sky and am a person often lost in my own thoughs,
I wanted to make some sort of fantasy setting. Like “A sea of clouds” with some ruins
and me looking through a window or sitting on the ruins.

Kaya_Kepa

The clouds, sea & floor are stock images from DeviantArt. The ruins (& me of course)
are taken from my own pictures.

Case 1.3

Third project this school year. This case was actually for one of our subjects
(Interaction & Design) which learns us how to program using Processing.
The amount of people in your group depended on what exactly it is you wanted to make.
My group had 3 people in it. You could choose between making some sort of
creature(s) that interact with you in some way or making something with multiple screens
(by setting up a server which allows (example) an object to move from one screen to
another). We chose the multiple screen option.

Our group made a bunch of jellyfish that swim upward over the screens. Two of us (me
& a friend) did the programming, while our third member did some artwork.
True, about 80% of the code was copied from the internet, but changing it so it works the
way we wanted to, putting it all together, making it work etc.. was no easy task for
people that know zero to nothing about programming, so we were quite proud of the
result. And personally, I think this has taught me a lot about programming and how
certain parts work/connect.

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Case 1.2

Our second important school project was also to be made in a group. And since we’re the
“Game Art & Design” group, our task was … to create a game! This time in a group of 3.
It had to be a game with “standard visuals” which means objects like cubes, spheres etc..
No complicated world with stylish characters or emotional storylines.

Our group made a game called “Tunnel Vision”. The player controls a ball rolling through
a tunnel and needs to collect points while avoiding obstacles. My strongest point is drawing
so I was in charge of making all of the artwork (from concept art to textures, buttons,
some level design etc..). Level design was mainly done by a second teammate though,
since he made the 3d levels in Blender. Our third member did all of the programming.
It might not be perfect but… seeing this game come to life and work was a big boost
for my “What are we really doing here” question.

dqfd Startscreen